Rich?

By some argument, using a percentage of GNP, John D. Rockefeller, the oil monopolist who died in 1937, was the richest man in American history; his net worth at its peak was some 2 percent of America’s annual income. Andrew Carnegie, the philanthropic steelmaker who died in 1919, may have been the second wealthiest American, with a similar slice of the GNP.

Bill Gates’ net worth amounts to less than 1 percent of the current national income. An economy that has grown into the trillions of dollars makes it less likely that any individual can own a substantial part of it. That fact alone means Bill Gates will probably never enjoy the political power that Rockefeller and Carnegie wielded at the peaks of their careers.

A third way to compare wealth across time is to look at the ratio between the earnings of the richest people and the earnings of the average citizen. By that calculation, the gap between Bill Gates and the Main Street man or woman is wider than at any time in history. In fact, calculations performed in 2007 suggest that for Bill Gates, $350,000 spent to buy a Lamborghini, for instance, would be the equivalent for the average American to spending 73 cents.

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How Online Branding Strategy Helps Growing A New Business

Branding is all about the perception customers have about your company, and your brand is the promise that you intend to make to the customers.  The ultimate goal is to spark an emotional connection in order to create a positive feeling with the result of loyalty to a specific product or service from the customers.

How it works: we recently helped the website Best GED Classes to drive revenue and reach their business goals by utilizing web 2.0 technologies. By implementing a full social strategy, we were making sure they would have had a consistent brand presence approach, and we creatively used many presence-building tools to surround consumers (students who prepare for the GED test) with the brand message. Our toolkit ranged from advertising, social PR, internet marketing, communities and social CRM.

We monitored the interaction among them (e.g. the impact blogs have on the effectiveness of promotions). Finally, we used “brand scorecards” that monitor presence-building tools and measure the impact of spending against the brand’s key objectives.

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What Your Copywriter Wants To Know

Imagine you’re a designer and your client says, “I want a cool font and I want my site/business card/logo to stand out.” It’s not a lot to go on, right?

You’ll want to know all kinds of other things: what their competitors are doing so you can make it stand out from theirs, what the general expectation of the industry is like (no good having a super-friendly, chatty site when potential customers are looking for super-professional), and what’s going to hook in their potential clients.

Copywriting is similar. I can’t count the number of times someone’s said to me that they want a website/brochure and then made me guess what they want by reading my draft and saying something like, “it’s not bad but it still needs more zing.”

All that achieves is that I don’t feel like I’m doing a good job by them, they don’t get what they want (usually because they don’t know what they want “but I’ll know when I see it”), and if they’ve chosen an hourly rate, it costs them more.

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