What is online reputation management?

Like it or not, people talk. Sometimes they say things that are true, sometimes they make up lies, but either way, negative information about your company is downright lethal. Whether it’s a customer who had a bad experience, an ex-employee who wants to get their own back or a direct competitor who wants to take you down, negative information can quickly spread around the local community via the internet.

Before you know it, you’re losing sales. That’s why reputation management is fast becoming one of the most popular services for all kinds of businesses, big and small, national and local. It’s a way to protect your online reputation from negative reviews, false claims, and other social threat, ethically and legally.  Reputation management involves a wide range of activities to keep your name in good standing.

Activities include responding to customer complaints, asking sites to take down incorrect information and using online feedback to improve your products and services. In short, it’s about monitoring the social media & web. Probably you are aware of all this stuff and already monitor your brand mentions. But there are new threats and this post is about to show you how to check if your brand reputation is in danger and how to protect it.

Read more

Rich?

By some argument, using a percentage of GNP, John D. Rockefeller, the oil monopolist who died in 1937, was the richest man in American history; his net worth at its peak was some 2 percent of America’s annual income. Andrew Carnegie, the philanthropic steelmaker who died in 1919, may have been the second wealthiest American, with a similar slice of the GNP.

Bill Gates’ net worth amounts to less than 1 percent of the current national income. An economy that has grown into the trillions of dollars makes it less likely that any individual can own a substantial part of it. That fact alone means Bill Gates will probably never enjoy the political power that Rockefeller and Carnegie wielded at the peaks of their careers.

A third way to compare wealth across time is to look at the ratio between the earnings of the richest people and the earnings of the average citizen. By that calculation, the gap between Bill Gates and the Main Street man or woman is wider than at any time in history. In fact, calculations performed in 2007 suggest that for Bill Gates, $350,000 spent to buy a Lamborghini, for instance, would be the equivalent for the average American to spending 73 cents.

Read more

What Your Copywriter Wants To Know

Imagine you’re a designer and your client says, “I want a cool font and I want my site/business card/logo to stand out.” It’s not a lot to go on, right?

You’ll want to know all kinds of other things: what their competitors are doing so you can make it stand out from theirs, what the general expectation of the industry is like (no good having a super-friendly, chatty site when potential customers are looking for super-professional), and what’s going to hook in their potential clients.

Copywriting is similar. I can’t count the number of times someone’s said to me that they want a website/brochure and then made me guess what they want by reading my draft and saying something like, “it’s not bad but it still needs more zing.”

All that achieves is that I don’t feel like I’m doing a good job by them, they don’t get what they want (usually because they don’t know what they want “but I’ll know when I see it”), and if they’ve chosen an hourly rate, it costs them more.

Read more